Can FOGO work in MUDs?

Following up on Virginia Brunton’s well received “Where to with food waste” article, Mike Ritchie discusses FOGO in MUDs.

Mike argues that collecting FOGO from MUDs is not just feasible, it is necessary. Getting food and garden waste out of all households will:
– reduce #waste to #landfill by 50% or more
– save up to 2.7% of Australia’s GHG emissions and
– produce millions of tonnes of soil enhancing compost.

Creating economic wealth from emissions reduction – a case study of recycling

The waste and recycling industry contributes close to 3% of Australia’s direct emissions. However, recycling abates much more by capturing the embodied energy of the recovered materials.

We can create a more sustainable Australia by reducing emissions, increasing recycling and growing new green jobs.

State of waste 2019

The Australian Commonwealth has achieved a first. A Minister for Waste (and Environmental Management) was announced by the Morrison Government. In the 200 years since colonial settlement we have not had a Minister with Waste in their title. I hope that ushers in a period of attention and reform.

Driving a circular economy

A circular economy is necessary to minimise landfill, increase resources recovery and protect our natural environment. A strong local reprocessing sector will also generate new jobs, support the economy and safeguard Australia from international developments such as China’s National Sword. Mike Ritchie outlines the key drivers for a strong Circular Economy in Australia.

Composting massively reduces greenhouse gas emissions compared to landfill

At a recent meeting with Local Government Mayors and CEO’s, a claim was made that transporting organics by truck to a distant compost facility (in this case 150km away) would emit more greenhouse gases than landfilling it locally. Thinking that the carbon forcing factor of methane from landfill (25 times CO2) would render that claim incorrect, I thought I should go back and check the maths.